Posts Tagged ‘copper’

Wired for silver: the Canterbury crafter who discovered a new passion

Monday, June 19th, 2017

Debbie of Wiredlove is a full time office worker, busy Mum to two teenage daughters (and one chocolate furbaby) and wife to Chris. Debbie creates her individual wearable art works in her spare time and dreams that one day her creations will adorn the necks and fingers of the rich and famous…

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wiredlove
wiredlove

What do you make?
I make handcrafted jewellery items using Sterling silver, copper, brass and mixed media.

How did you get into your craft?
I have always done crafty things, be it clothes, or toys for my children or family or friends’ kids. But in the last four years I have gotten into jewellery – this started with a friend giving me some artistic wire and some beads and it went from there.

Do you have formal training or qualifications in your craft?
In 2014 I attended a level 1 and 2 silver course with The Silversmiths’ Guild of Canterbury, who run courses at The Tannery in Woolston, Christchurch. From my very first lesson you could say I was hooked – I enjoyed it so much I became a Committee member on the Guild! The SSG run monthly workshops for members – so I’m always learning new techniques.

Your favourite materials, tools and processes?
I love mixing silver and copper in my creations. Both metals react differently once heated – over-heat silver and it will melt!

wiredlove
wiredlove

wiredlove pohutakawa blog

Tell us about the techniques involved in producing one of your jewellery pieces:
Where do I start? Designing, handsawing a piece of silver plate, heating, forming, soldering, filing… not my most favourite job, but must be done!

What inspires you?
Everything inspires me. I love everything to do with nature, shapes… the list could go on. I also love looking at fashions overseas to see which way the trends are going.

Describe your creative process:
Sometimes I will wake up with ideas and sometimes just looking at something will give me an idea. I can’t say I have certain look to my jewellery (i.e. a range) – I’m forever trying new ideas out.

Describe your workspace:
Cluttered, disorganised and a work in progress. I currently have my work station set up in our office and my soldering station set up in our garage. My dream would be to have a bright airy studio in my backyard or at least a jeweller’s bench, which I’ve been waiting a couple of years for my brother-in-law to make, LOL!

wiredlove
wiredlove
wiredlove
wiredlove

wiredlove 3 blog

Your favourite feedback from a customer:
Just seeing the customer’s face on seeing an item is feedback enough.

What are you currently listening to?
Imagine Dragons – Thunder.

Recommend an album:
Imagine Dragons – Smoke + Mirrors – they are my favourites at the moment.

What are you reading right now?
Nora Roberts – Whiskey Beach.

A favourite quote:
Every accomplishment starts with the decision to try.

Tell us about your pets:
An eight year old chocolate lab named Rusty – he’s finally starting to get out of the puppy stage! :-)

What would your advice be for those starting out in a crafty business?
Never give up on your dreams.

What was the last handmade item you bought and what attracted you to it?
Some beautiful body butter by Inga Ford Soapmaker, in Peachy – smells divine and leaves my skin feeling beautiful.

What’s in store for the rest of 2017?
I’m currently working on some commission work which I love doing. Perhaps some markets once the weather warms up, and The Silversmiths’ Guild have an exhibition later in the year – so I’ll be working towards this.

wiredlove
wiredlove

wiredlove bracelet blog

Debbie has generously offered a sweet prize of a stamped Sterling silver adjustable bracelet with either ‘Aroha’ ‘Love’ or ‘Kia Kaha’ stamped on it, valued at $45.00 (see above) for one lucky Felt reader. To be in to win this beautiful bracelet, simply leave a comment telling us what you like about Debbie’s story and her creations. The draw will be made on Friday 30 June and is open to New Zealand residents only.

 

Purchase from Wiredlove here »

 

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Fairytale characters and crystal caves: an adventure wrought in silver

Monday, October 24th, 2016

Kim Goulding-Piper of Ore and Wander has been building her relationship with crystal and metal since she was a child. Her journey has taken her from beaches and caves, through managing a chain of prestigious crystal shops in the UK, to Aotearoa, where she now sits in her workshop with a view of snow-capped mountains.

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What do you make?
I create jewellery including rings, necklaces, pendants, earrings, bangles, tiaras, ear cuffs, and wands.

How did you get into your craft?
I grew up living on a boat in a new age town, and I think the combination really fostered a love of fossicking on beaches and finding precious rocks. At an early age I would fill my pockets with rocks and hoard my treasure in my room. From there I started to collect crystals and when I was 10 years old my grandmother died leaving me a beautiful smokey quartz necklace. This began my crystal bead collection and at 16 I had my first exhibition in a local gallery.

The same year a crystal shop opened in my home town I knew I had to work there, so I went and asked for a job. They were not hiring at the time but being desperate for the job I asked to be trained so that when a position opened up I would be exactly what they needed. Liking my enthusiasm they hired me straight away and I worked for the Crystals Company for 14 years, becoming part of a wonderful family. I filled many roles within the company and loved every position I held there, especially getting paid to talk to people about crystals all day long!

The company helped me realise my dream by facilitating an apprenticeship with the company goldsmith. From there the fairy-tale began: everyday I would go in to the workshop and fix, tinker with, and create jewellery with the resident goldsmith. It was like entering a crystal cave and working with a dwarf to create glittering treasure.

In this time I also trained in crystal therapy, which I still practice today. After learning my trade I came to New Zealand (9 years ago) and lived in a house truck until meeting my wonderful partner and having my beautiful son.

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Do you have formal training or qualifications in your craft?
My training was intensive and lasted many years, but it was not formal and I have no paper to say I know how to do what I do. I spent many years doing all the silver and many of the gold repairs, along with commissions and designing new ranges, for 21 shops. Dwarfs living in crystal caverns tend to be more focused on practical skills rather than paper ones!

Your favourite materials, tools and processes?
I love to work with crystals, blending the healing properties to suit people’s needs. This led me to spend lots of time looking at archetypes and stories. Often my work is inspired by the crystal’s properties, people, and more recently stories. There is often a fairy-tale or character behind a finished product.

Tell us about some of the techniques involved in producing your jewellery
I try to keep the techniques simple. Once I am in the workshop, taming the ideas in to a few I can stick to is my main focus, then lots of soldering and setting stones (and lots of singing and hopefully no swearing). Next a bit of polishing where everything gets nice and shiny except me, then off to have a nice soak in the bath!

What inspires you?
Most recently I have been inspired by the stories I make up to tell my five year old son every night. We go on fantastical journeys, where anything can happen and we meet incredible characters on the way. I find that some of the characters are still with me in the morning when I go into the workshop. My latest range has no crystals but is infused with the magic of the fairy-tales we share and the things that stir emotions in us.

oreandwander

oreandwander

Is there a philosophy behind your work?
My philosophy is that jewellery is not just something to match an outfit to, but something that has meaning and can act as a reminder for us to focus on the positive. Whether it is a reminder of the person who gave it to you, the quality that you are trying to work on, or a feeling/character that you love.

Describe your creative process:
Often I dream of what I am going to make next, sometimes the stones seem to know how they want to be set and sometimes the stories find their own way on to the work. I try not to force the work, there are some days where nothing comes and some days where you have so many ideas that you have to thin them out before they overwhelm you. I have often found it difficult to represent my work in one style as there are always so many new ideas that I want to try, so many things that inspire me. I try to catch as many as I can, but for each piece I create at least ten slip through my grasp and float off!

Describe your work space:
My workshop is small but seems big to me after living in boats, house trucks and geodomes. It is a luxury to have a separate room to go to! I try to fill my work space with things that inspire me, remind me of friends and places, or tell me stories. I have a fantastic display cabinet made from an old Singer sewing machine that my wonderful partner made for me as a moving in present.

oreandwander

oreandwander

I work from home and when the weather is nice I take small sanding and filing jobs out in to the sun with a cup of tea. We live in the middle of nowhere with no neighbours, and stunning views of the mountains and the Port Hills, so it is very relaxing.

Five words that describe your mind:
Dreamlike, excited, holistic, meandering and intuitive.

Your favourite feedback from a customer:
One of my customers told me that during the Feb 22 (2011) earthquake in Christchurch, she had to walk through the city centre with her little dog to get out of the city. She told me that she carried the dog in her arms but put her hand over the bangle I had made because all she could think of was how devastated she would be if she lost or damaged it in the chaos. To be up there in importance with someone’s favourite pet in an emergency was very special.

What are you currently listening to?
I listen to lots of different music: mostly tunes that make me feel good, I can sing along to, and have a good story. I love old English folk for the stories, I listen to world music and sing along in a language I don’t know if the song stirs my emotions. I listen to devotional music to calm my soul. I love music that reminds me of people, there really is not a lot that I don’t appreciate.

At night when I tell my son stories they often end with me singing a song to him so I try to introduce him to as many different music styles as I can, I think music is like taste you have to try things and hear things a few times to learn to enjoy them. I also love to listen to BBC Radio plays in my workshop.

oreandwander

oreandwander

Recommend an album:
One album is too hard! Try new things often and look for the beauty in all of it. I recommend checking out The BBC Archives and trying samples of folk, world, 60s, classical… anything you don’t usually listen to. Expand your horizons!

What’s your favourite childhood book and why?
I love to read, so did my Mum and Dad. I could name a hundred books I loved as a child but my favourite was always the one that Mum or Dad was reading to me at the time. I knew if they had a book in their hand I could go and snuggle up on the sofa with them for a long relaxing reading session! My Mum was great at all the voices and I loved hearing my Dad read the Just So Stories so much that I asked him to record them for my son. Mum and I collected the pieces to make the Magic Alphabet Necklace from How the Alphabet Was Made for years. I am still looking for a few letters!

What are you reading now?
Jasper Fforde’s The Well of Lost Plots and Mitch Album’s Tuesdays with Morrie (again). It is one of my favourite books and reminds me of my Mum’s grace, courage and wisdom.

Who is your hero/heroine? Why?
My Mum. She worked so hard to make herself into the person she knew her children deserved. She was true to herself and lived with integrity. She made me who I am and that reminds me that I am always good enough.

A favourite quote:
“We are all here because we have more to learn, if we didn’t we wouldn’t need to be here and we would evolve!” – My Mum.

“There used to be giants in the sky who looked after everything but they all died so now the police have to do it.” – My son (at age 4).

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Tell us about your pets:
We have a beautiful cat called Itty Nabibi (Little Black Panther) who is fantastically independent, properly witchy and super snuggly.

If you were a crafty superhero, what would your name and superpower be?
My super power would be to make all my jewellery able to come alive and tell the stories that inspired them. My name: the Silver Story Singer.

What would your advice be for those starting out in a crafty business?
Do what you love.

What was the last handmade item you bought and what attracted you to it?
I bought a beautiful sculpture from one of my favourite local artists, Blanch Fryer. I brought it for my wonderful partner who works in the circus field and loves all things circus, especially clowns and object manipulation. The sculpture was of a jester juggling, and Blanch had captured the expression so beautifully. I think Blanch may have my super hero skill as I feel that her work is about to come alive and tell me a fantastical story!

What’s in store for the rest of the year, and 2017?
I have no idea! Where is the fun in having it all mapped out? I have a hundred things I want to create, at least two new ranges that I want to get stuck into, and a secret project that I am itching to start. I have the feeling that 2017 is going to be exciting! I have had four delightful years at home with my son, but I am now beginning to refocus my attention on my creative goals and that fills me with a sense of adventure.

 

See more from Ore and Wander here »

 

oreandwander

Copper, timber and time: the sculptural forms of Cobredera

Monday, February 15th, 2016

Like many makers, Christchurch craftsman Ben Teeuwen’s journey started with making handcrafted gifts that drew compliments and led to word-of-mouth interest. From that emerged a plan to fashion beautiful jewellery using natural timber and recycled copper. His shop name, Cobredera, comes from the two Spanish words for his favourite materials: cobre (copper) and madera (wood).

Cobredera diamond pendant

What do you make?
I make both copper and wood jewellery, on their own, or both combined where possible. That consists of earrings, pendants and rings. I also use a little bit of brass. All the copper sheet, wire and so on is recycled (rescued from old machinery or bought from a scrap metal merchant).

Most of the wood used has been found on the beach, on the West Coast (red beech, beech), or from trees that I have obtained from family or clients (apple, kowhai, blackboy peach). But my most favourite material I have used so far in my jewellery has been an 80 year old walnut tree I found in a South Canterbury river, part of its trunk and, most importantly for me, its roots. You will see in my jewellery how dark the items are that have come from the roots, almost petrified.

How did you get into your craft?
I had made a few small simple pieces of jewellery, a couple initially for my wonderful mum, and then I gave a couple away. But what really got my creative juices flowing was when I had made some earrings for my physio, as a thank you for the more than 10 years of work she had done on me. They were round walnut root earrings with a copper inlay. It was not so much her response (which was hugely appreciated) but the comments she received from friends and family when she was wearing them. That made me think that what I was making was turning people’s heads.

Do you have formal training or qualifications in your craft?
I do not have any formal training, but I have been very fortunate to have been guided by Tatyanna Meharry at Risingholme, where I was the only male doing jewellery making, in the corner whilst a pottery class was going on! She was very helpful with me getting to grips with the basics of working with copper, and soldering, and other techniques. I would come to class with a partially made item, and with a plan of how I would finish the item, and she would be helpful in leaving it as I had planned or tweaking it to make it something special. But all the shapes and designs are my own.

Cobredera walnut root pendant

Cobredera disc earrings

Your favourite materials, tools and processes?
My favourite materials are the more heavily grained timbers, which mostly come in the form of native driftwood found on the beaches on the West Coast. I spend ages combing the piles washed up at a beautiful northern West Coast beach (and swatting the hundreds of sandflies that enjoy me!). The wood has to be left for some time to dry, at least for six months, and even then when it’s cut open it can still be surprisingly wet inside from the journey it has had downriver and in the sea, before being washed up.

My favourite materials are the more heavily grained timbers, which mostly come in the form of native driftwood found on the beaches on the West Coast.

My favourite tools are my bandsaw, which I use to cut open the chunks of driftwood or other timber used and reveal the grains and colour inside.

I use my belt sander (upside down) as my creator of form/shape, because a planned shape or design often does not end up as such and a new form often appears. It is a hungry beast, often ripping my gloves or spitting a piece out that I am working on! But is a huge time saver.

For shaping irregular designs I use a Dremel handpiece with a number of shaping burrs. I must also not forget to mention my wood lathe, which I use to make round earrings, pendants, and necklace parts. Getting the amazing final results in both metal and wood is the boring and repetitive sanding, going through the various grades and finishing with steel wool. There’s a total of seven different lots of sanding per jewellery item! That is why I have started making some more basic jewellery, that still shows off its amazing characteristics, but is somewhat less refined, reflected in the price.

But my most favourite part of the whole process is the application of the natural oil I use, made by the Natural House Co. Suddenly the amazing colours and grains pop out at you, and it leaves a soft satiny finish.

A selection of the materials Ben uses to create his jewellery.

cobredera triangle earrings

What inspires you?
Basically it’s whatever comes into my head. My job as a landscape gardener leaves plenty of space in the head to allow it to wander off and come up with new ideas. I do actually need to aim my thinking at a problem I am having, or apply the brain to a new set of designs. Then when I stop for a break, I will make a note of a new creation.

My job as a landscape gardener leaves plenty of space in the head to allow it to wander off and come up with new ideas.

Is there a philosophy behind your work?
My main aim is to make jewellery that is different, that is unique, and enhances the actual materials that I use. Just to be able to surprise prospective customers with the type of wood used on an item they may be interested in is a very enjoyable experience. There are not many people making jewellery out of wood the way I do, so I hope to be breaking new ground. With the wood, I aim to show off its natural colours and grains, and the copper or other metals, to show them off in their own best unique lustre where possible.

Describe your workspace:
Workspace for me is in about three places. The photo is a corner of my office I use for finishing items, oiling them, fitting copper wire fittings,etc. The other main area is my garage, where my bandsaw and wood lathe sit, (but it is not tidy enough for a photo!) and then normally an outside seat in my garden where I sit with a board on my lap, wearing overalls and a dust mask, and go through the sanding process. If it’s wet, I sit in my garage.

Ben Teeuwen of Cobredera at work on his jewellery

Cobredera turned earrings

Five words that describe your mind:
Surprising, creative, from left field, muddled, determined.

Your favourite feedback from a customer: Just that whenever they were wearing the jewellery they had bought from me, without fail they’d been asked at least two or three times where they had bought it and who had made it.

Who is your hero/heroine?
My hero or heroes really are my parents, who made many sacrifices to emigrate to New Zealand from The Netherlands over 40 years ago to create for themselves and me and my brother a new and better life. It is a very short sentence to describe the long and hard working effort put in by them both. Something I will always be thankful for!

What are you reading now?
I just returned a couple of fiction books written by New Zealand authors, but did not keep their names! I tend to try to read Kiwi written books where possible.

A favourite quote:
“Someone who saves something, has something!” A translation of a Dutch saying. This quote applies very much to what I make. My dad has accumulated many things over the years, like the copper sheet and wire that I am now using in my jewellery. And as time goes on, I’m accumulating plenty as well.

If you were a crafty superhero, what would your name and superpower be?
The name COBREDERA would stay the same, but my superpower would be to be someone like a Michael Hill, or a world renowned brand like a Gucci, and have my jewellery sold all over the world, and the riches that come with it! Maybe I dream too much!

Cobredera pendants

Simple walnut pendant by Cobredera

What would your advice be for those starting out in a crafty business?
Oh boy, that is so hard, as there are as many theories on success and failure as there are sunrises! Give it a go! Experienced people I have talked to in regards how they have found the magic formula for successful sales and thereby successful businesses, say that there is not one! For me it’s early days yet and am reluctant to step out of my safety zone to use social media to promote my product, and I do struggle with the technology, but maybe I need to put my head above the parapet and say “Here I am!”.

But I do know that those that have been successful have worked very hard at it, and have stuck at it, and when they’ve had disappointing days at markets have persevered and also had good days. Give it a go but do not hang everything you have on what you want to do. All you need sometimes is a lucky break, in whichever form that takes. Do not make decisions off the cuff – take the ideas or propositions people make to you home and spend time thinking about them.

I do know that those that have been successful have worked very hard at it … and when they’ve had disappointing days at markets have persevered and also had good days.

What was the last handmade item you bought and what attracted you to it?
I don’t know if a fine bottle of wine from Marlborough whilst on holiday is regarded as handmade, but I think so as the grapes where handpicked and put through various processes by the hands of the winemaker. And because I love a good bottle of wine! (We agree! – Felt team.)

What’s in store for 2016?
A number of things for me. One, I have to spend more time on practising my soldering techniques so that I can make more affordable but still stunning copper wire jewellery. I also need to spend more weekends at markets, as I have on an infrequent basis at the Harbour Bazaar, which is joined onto the Lyttelton Farmers’ Market. I have a number of designs running through my head for new stuff, and also some jewellery that is going to be OUT there! I am a long way yet from being an accomplished or established jewellery maker, but that is the challenge, I have lots to learn and improve on.

Also to go on holiday soon to the West Coast to my special place, and bring back more beautiful driftwood home!

 

See more by Cobredera on Felt »

 

cobredera collection

Stacks of beautiful rings

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

Rings on her fingers, bells on her toes… stacks of new jewellery ready to go!

From Zazing, we have these ingenious and intriguing double finger rings, in elegant swooping silver loops. Nikki assures us they are very comfortable and allow the full range of movement. She’s even tested them out typing, doing the dishes, cooking and driving, just to make sure!

zazing

zazing 2

And these wee copper lovelies from Ply caught our eye too – what beautiful hammered detail! Kate likes to work in simple hammered textures, as well as using stamped designs like dandelion motifs. She then treats them with patina to bring out the pattern. She reckons it’s so much fun she has to resist doing it to all of them!

ply

ply 2

There are so many beautiful rings on Felt to choose from, made here in New Zealand by our talented jewellers, you can have gorgeous jewellery wherever you go. Have a browse!

Frocktober day 8: Ashantede

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Here’s another eye-catching evening piece for Frocktober, this one from new seller Ashantede. This beautiful mini dress in black and olive green has a lovely tailored fit and striking copper highlights. Dress it up with heels for a night out, or transform it to daywear by teaming it with some leggings.

ashantede

We have some lovely copper jewellery on Felt to go with this coppery creation – just have a look at these lovely examples from Metal Mania, Wendy Lindsay and Copper Kowhai

copperkowhai

We’re rocking Frocktober all month here at Felt, so stay tuned for more!

Moonlight sonata

Monday, August 11th, 2014

jenniemudown

wendilindsay

jodiesart

copperkowhai

Featured Seller: BaldMoose

Monday, May 26th, 2014

baldmoose kereru earrings

BaldMoose is the quirky moniker for jeweller and crafter Eileen Leahy’s personality-filled range of jewellery and crochet. Born in Whakatane, Eileen grew up in Kawerau and then Taumarunui – small towns in rural areas of New Zealand’s North Island. Eileen draws inspiration from her surroundings; New Zealand’s native plants and wildlife, landscapes, and simple things like a flower in her garden. The name BaldMoose was spawned from a bizarre conversation during Eileen’s time at high school – and it has just stuck. Some of her more quirky pieces of work reflect these carefree years.


What do you make?
I make jewellery, mainly in sterling silver, and I have recently added crochet items to my shop. I find crocheting addictive and love coming up with new ideas for cute little soft toys – the next project I have in mind is crochet toys for cats, laced with catnip!


Eileen working at her jewellery bench

How did you get into your craft?
I’ve always been an artist. I got into jewellery because I felt that I best suited creating small detailed work, which I still believe to be true about myself. I began to learn to crochet nearly a year ago. My Oma used to crochet a lot and I wanted to carry on the craft within our family as well as to be able to make useful items for my future family which could be passed down through the generations.


Do you have formal training or qualifications in your craft?
I studied at Hungry Creek Art and Craft School where I gained an Advanced Diploma in Arts and Craft, majoring in jewellery. I spent four years studying full-time to achieve this.


Your favourite materials, tools and processes?
My favourite material for crochet has got to be New Zealand wool. I love to buy New Zealand products wherever possible. When making jewellery I enjoy using sterling silver and copper as well as acrylic resin, and more recently, glass beads. I bought a hanging motor about four years ago and it has been such a useful tool! You can change the heads on it for so many different jobs; drilling, burring, polishing, and so much more.

Shhh… really, I love all my tools equally!


Eileen's jewellery bench

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What inspires you?
I’m inspired by fond memories of my childhood, plant life and playful things… small things that can often be overlooked in adulthood, but a child would revel in. This autumn I planted pots of daffodil and tulip bulbs, some of them have just begun sprouting through the dirt and I find that so exciting and inspiring.


Is there a philosophy behind your work?
I make because I can’t not make. I have spent my whole life doing handcrafts of one sort or another and couldn’t imagine living without it. Being able to make someone happy with a handmade gift or purchase is such a huge added bonus and it really does make it worthwhile.


Describe your workspace:
I crochet on the couch in the lounge, which is covered with half-finished projects and bags of wool. My jewellery bench is in the spare room… It’s incredibly cluttered to say the least! The materials from every project I have worked on in the last six months still sits on my bench and there are piles of papers, canvases, bags of wool and crochet, and materials for jewellery stacked up around the bench so that there is only really enough room to sit. I’m not naturally a tidy person.


The spare room

Crochet in the lounge

Five words that describe your mind:
Nostalgic, hippy, dreamer, eclectic and unordered.


Your favourite feedback from a customer:
I received this message from a customer – she’s from America and had recently visited New Zealand. She bought my Pukeko stud earrings and she and her daughter share them, which I thought was really sweet.

“Hello! I received the earrings today and they are absolutely wonderful! You did a wonderful job on them. I love these little swamp hens. We got to visit NZ in February and I was able to see some of these birds. My daughter is wearing your earrings now, we get to trade off with them. Thank you again. Heather.”


What are you currently listening to?
Whatever my lovely boyfriend, Hugh, is playing. Right now its dubstep, fast paced, but chilled out at the same time. I have quite a mixed taste in music.


Recommend an album:
The Cranberries, No Need To Argue has to be my fav for a sing along on a melancholy grey day spent inside.


Eileen's friend's baby Alek with teddy, Edmond.

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What are you reading now?
I’m partway through reading The Handmade Marketplace: How to Sell Your Crafts Locally, Globally, and On-Line by Kari Chapin, which Felt kindly recommended to me last year!


Do you have any pets?
I don’t have any pets of my own, but my flatmates have cats. Koda is definitely Queen Bee around here, we call her Avakoda because of her pear shaped physique. Rexy is a timid little mottled creature. She watches from the driveway but as soon as you acknowledge her she freaks out, freezes, and then runs away.



What was the last handmade item you bought and what attracted you to it?
The last handmade item I bought was from the Coatsville Market. It’s a wooden board made from recycled furniture with an awesome painting of a kakariki on it by Doug Ford. I love New Zealand birds and the painting is just so cool, I wish I could have bought the whole lot!

Eileen will be showing new BaldMoose jewellery, along with six other jewellers, in “RE: A Contemporary Jewellery Exhibition” at the Allpress Gallery. The opening is 5.30pm on July 15th. She also regularly has work at Off the Bench in Waihi Beach.

Eileen has also very kindly offered one lucky reader one of her gorgeous Kiwi Love rings, a reversible silver ring with a heart on one side and a kiwi on the other. If you want to be in the draw, Eileen would like you to leave a comment suggesting a new animal for her to crochet – so get your thinking cap on! The draw will be made on Monday 9 June and is open to New Zealand residents only.

baldmoose kiwi love ring