Posts Tagged ‘baking’

Creativity for a rainy day

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

We’re all for hunkering down inside on rainy days like these! What you need now are some crafty projects to settle in with. Felt has a great range of materials, tools, patterns and kits to get you started – here’s a few to tempt you!

Gorgeous watercolour paints from Celia Wilson, made from locally-sourced pigments.

celiawilson blog

Fabulous customisable stretched artist’s canvases, boards & blocks from Stretched.

stretched blog

Lovely yarns from a variety of very interesting creatures, hand dyed by Crock.

crock blog

Cosy winter knitting patterns from Honeycakes too!

honeycakes blog

Or maybe cross stitch is more your thing? Teribear has you sorted.

teribear

And how about some fabulous cookie cutters from Making It for rainy day baking? Mmmm, cookies…

makingit blog

Feeling inspired? Check out the whole creative range in our Leisure and Activities pages today!

Let them eat cake (and they did)

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

We felt it was our duty. It was a tough job but someone had to do it. Delicious-looking baking mixes from Cupcake Sweeties had appeared on Felt, and it was agreed at Felt HQ that these had to be tested for the good of all our Felt customers. We’re so selfless like that.

cupcakesweet

Selections were made (Chocolate Cake Mix and Chocolate Buttercream) and a cake duly baked. We planned to photograph the cake in all its glory (for indeed it did look glorious) but then a terrible accident happened.

cakeremains

Oops. Oh well. We can report that it was extremely, dangerously delicious. Further experimentation is highly recommended. :-)

 

Purchase from Cupcake Sweeties on Felt »

 

Easter activities for the whanau

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

We’ve got some colourful ideas for creative Easter activities with the kids…

Easter biscuits are a perennial favourite and the kids will love these 3D printed cutters from Making It – the bunnies are a must!

makingit2

makingit

Who doesn’t love an egg hunt? The whole whanau can make their own personalised collecting baskets with these gorgeous kits from Sew Personal.

sewpersonal

sewpersonal2

And here’s a great idea for gifts the kids can give – let them decorate their own eggs and box them up in these sweet gift boxes (with a matching card) from Catalina.

catalina

Felt is filling up with great Easter goodies and there’s still time to pick yours out – have a handmade treasure hunt today!

Raaaawr!

Monday, July 20th, 2015

We all know that “Raawr!” is dinosaur for I love you, right? Right?

splodgedesign

Movies like Jurassic World may seek to malign the dinosaur as vicious and bloodthirsty, but here at Felt we’ve got plenty of evidence that they’re really loveable softies. I mean, c’mon. Who could possibly think these adorable faces have something nefarious planned?

makingit

rachyconn

crazycrayons

Give your favourite dinosaur a hug and a “Raawr!” today – you know they deserve some love. :-)

cosycreation

A snowy morning

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

Brrr! There’s a dusting of snow outside this morning in Christchurch and the chill is bracing. Growing up further north, I never saw snow in town so I still get a childlike delight when I open the curtains and find the world has been frosted white.

honeycakes

Here’s a small pictorial celebration of snow, just because. :-) Stay warm everyone!

dorikae

silverlight

makingit

biglittle

Idyllic childhood days

Monday, April 8th, 2013

Piano Rock: A 1950s Childhood by Gavin Bishop

Piano Rock: A 1950s Childhood
By Gavin Bishop · Reviewed by Anne Mortimer

With a “to be read” queue that will take me easily into retirement, Piano Rock immediately drew me in thanks to the beautiful silhouettes, line drawings and watercolour illustrations that pepper the bite-sized chapters. However more importantly, this was 1950s spelt correctly, with no superfluous apostrophes thank you very much.

Piano Rock tells the story of Gavin Bishop’s 1950s childhood, growing up in Kingston beside Lake Wakatipu. Each chapter offers a snapshot of life and the variety of memorable happenings that shaped Gavin’s childhood between the ages of four and eight, beginning with the Bishop family’s journey via goods train from Invercargill to Kingston sitting on their couch in the guard’s van with the doors open taking in all of the scenery. Despite the different time period, the themes covered are ones that younger readers can associate with, or imagine: looking forward to visits from Grandma; learning to swim; an out of the ordinary school outing in the back of a  farm truck to the Nevis Valley; the arrival of a new baby brother and the impact that has on an older child.

Piano Rock: A 1950s Childhood by Gavin Bishop

Piano Rock: A 1950s Childhood by Gavin Bishop

I particularly enjoyed the description of the food, which is all very “matter of fact”. The baking of girdle scones was a Sunday ritual and a recipe is included for readers to try. Mrs Bishop’s traditional fare was influenced by the neighbouring Greek and Romanian families. This really struck me as my mother’s cooking didn’t take on any cosmopolitan influence until the late 1970s. I remember thinking how experimental my friend’s mam was because she cooked spaghetti bolognaise and such like when we were faced with leek pudding and neck chops with barley! Piano Rock draws to a close with the dramatic recollection of a bonfire on Guy Fawkes Night through the eyes of a small boy. The tale is neatly brought to a close, with Gavin reflecting upon a family photo, which mirrors the start of the book as the Bishop family prepare to leave Kingston for Invercargill in 1954.

I have re-read the book with Miss X who often asks me tell her about “the olden days” or, a story from when I was little. Piano Rock offers younger readers an affectionate reminiscence of a 1950s childhood, ably assisted with delightful illustrations and a handy-dandy glossary in the back.

Anne Mortimer is a sometime mum and sometime administrator. She also makes handcrafted felt items and will occasionally sell these. Anne has worked for museums, galleries and libraries in the UK and settled in New Zealand four years ago.